The Simplicity of Snow

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It’s cold and snowy here in Northern Illinois, and my kids and I couldn’t be happier. Well, everyone but the youngest, who’s on day two of an ear-infection-induced fever (he’s on antibiotics, just has stubborn ears, rather like the rest of him).110669070_a48537f62d

Snow means hours of outdoor play for my kids, and often for me too (when my pasty behind isn’t stuck in my office chair goofing around on Twitter rushing toward a deadline or blogging about fun things to do here). Even though it’s bitterly cold outside, my kids don’t care, partly because they have decent snow gear (snow pants, parkas, hats, mittens, and boots) and partly because a healthy snowfall transforms our property into one giant white sandbox (sans any visible signs of the neighbors’ cats poop).

We’re fortunate to have a slightly hilly driveway. Well, “fortunate” in the “kids’ play” sense, not in the “try driving a minivan up that icy hill in February” sense. So when it snows, the boys grab their saucer sleds (yes, they still make ‘em!) and start wearing grooves into the driveway. We also have a toboggan-style sled so all three can glide down together, shrieking with part healthy fear and part unadulterated joy.

Snow forts are a rare treat when enough good packing snow falls to create one. Last winter the boys made an igloo that ended up more like a turret, but they loved it anyway. I didn’t have one of those plastic igloo brick makers, but a metal loaf pan made a great substitute in a pinch.

Snow angels are another fun way to enjoy a snowy day; we like drawing funny faces on ours.

For younger kids who might be more tentative or have sensory issues, let them bring some snow inside or onto an enclosed porch. Here’s what I did for my then-three-year-old last winter:

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He was content just sitting on our front porch like this, which felt safer for him than laying down in the snow or being pelted with brotherly snowballs. Another great thing about snow is that it’s usually pretty clean so I can let my kids play with my wire whisk and ice cream scoop without worrying too much about them.

Of course, everybody loves a good, old-fashioned snowball fight. (Except the first kid to get nailed in the face by one).

Since we have a long back yard, my oldest boy will drag a sled all around to make trails the boys can follow. Today, my four-year-old formulated big plans before heading outside. “I want to wide in da sled,” he said. “Jackson will pull me.” Yeah, those youngest kids know how to work it, don’t they?

Of course there’s always winter hiking, ice skating, snowshoeing, and cross-country skiing, not to mention downhill skiing, snowboarding and even dogsledding! But what I’m talking about now are things kids and families can do right outside their back doors.

Outdoor winter fun is limited to your imagination – it’s always amazing to see what my kids come up with, too; yesterday they molded Star Wars spaceships out of snow.

After Christmas, I’ll write about our experiences with Snowboarding 101, since it looks like Santa will be placing two beginner-level (read: plastic) snowboards under the tree (the four-year-old will get a cool new sled so he doesn’t feel left out).110669069_8373ba1460

For those of you in colder regions, how do you and your kids enjoy the snow? What do you warm weather readers do for winter fun that’s different from summertime?

Share your favorite wintry things to do in the comments section.

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